Great Australian Food Tours for Your Trip Down Under

Great Australian Food Tours for Your Trip Down Under Six states and two territories are chock-a-block with wine, cheeses, organic produce, restaurants, cafes and food outlets

Read More

The History of Sandgate Australia

Cabbage Tree Creek, that was how Sandgate was originally known, and the Aboriginals also gave it the name Warra, which means, a stretch or expanse of water. This magnificent place possible received it’s name from Sandgate, which was located, in the county of Kent,...
Read More

Great Australian Food Tours for Your Trip Down Under

Australia is a wide-open land, full of undiscovered bounty, with regions boasting produce and gourmet foods of unimaginable delight. Six states and two territories are chock-a-block with wine, cheeses, organic produce, restaurants, cafes and food outlets. Demeter has blessed this Great Southern Land, with her seasons of plenty to be enjoyed by all. Visitors are most welcome in the lush and verdant pastures of these regional produce areas. Australians are down to earth people; and they love to share a good feed with tourists and locals alike.

Great Australian Food Tours for Your Trip Down Under

In the spirit of this bonhomie, locals have organised food tours for visitors to really chow down on the best Oz has to offer. Our world-famous wines are no longer a state secret, having travelled far and wide to the shores of Europe, China and America. Why not visit the iconic Penfolds winery in the Barossa Valley, or sojourn to Margaret River to taste the exciting wines of the west, or, perhaps, go up country to the Hunter Valley in NSW? There are so many superb spots to visit on the great Australian wine trail.

A great eating guide can set you in the right direction, to, perhaps, avoid a sore back from travelling. Knowing where you are going can be a mixed blessing, however, as you may miss out on those unexpected pleasures from accidental discoveries. Click here to read about great kitchens in this great country. Sometimes the rarest pleasures whilst travelling, come from home cooked meals with ordinary locals. It is here that you get to meet the real Australia, without the formal stuff on the surface. Blue singlet Aussies whipping up a feast on the BBQ, or mums making mouth-watering meals for family, and young folk partying on the patio with finger-food.

Well-seasoned travellers know the secret of discovering the heart of a land lies in breaking bread with the locals. When you eat the national dishes of a country, you imbibe the intangible lore of the land. In Australia, the culinary landscape has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades, as multiculturalism has blessed our cities and towns with great restaurants and eateries. You can eat Greek, Italian, Chinese and Lebanese in Oz. You can sup on superb French, Japanese and Modern Australian dishes. You can, even, settle for something more prosaic, like English or American fare. There is something for everyone in Australia.

 

The History of Sandgate Australia

The History of Sandgate Australia

Cabbage Tree Creek, that was how Sandgate was originally known, and the Aboriginals also gave it the name Warra, which means, a stretch or expanse of water. This magnificent place possible received it’s name from Sandgate, which was located, in the county of Kent, England. After the coming of the railway in 1882, land in Sandgate became available shortly thereafter in 1883. However, Sandgate was declared an official town, by the Governor of Queensland in 1880.

One could travel from Sandgate to Brisbane Australia by train in about thirty minutes, and Sandgate quickly became a popular weekend destination. Countless people would travel from Brisbane to get away from the heat, and because Sandgate had become very well known for it’s clean beaches.

Sandgate is also very well known for it’s historical landmarks, such as The Town Hall, and The Baptist Church.

Sandgate is a very artistic town, and has been the home of a large community theater group, better known as Sandgate Theatre Incorporated. They have been performing at Sandgate Town Hall for better than fifty years, and have been continuously doing so since 1958. The Yarrageh Festival In Brisbane is the longest running community festival, and this group also performs there annually.

The Sandgate Hotel was the first hotel to be built in the Sandgate community, it was established by Charles Davie in 1858. Next to come to this town was seaside cottages, which were listed in the local newspaper, and being rented out for three dollars a week, in the late 1860’s. Following this was John Baxter’s Café, which was established at Cabbage Creek in 1862.

The population grew, along with the number of accommodation houses, which included Villa Marina, Belair, and Musgrave in the 1870’s. Then a soft drink manufacturing commenced starting in the 1880’s.

Think of this place as a gateway into another world. Somewhere that you thought couldn’t possibly exist anymore. This place is full of background, and historical buildings. Every spot has a story behind it.

Australia alone is a wonderful place to visit, but Sandgate is a beautiful, mysterious and magical place. When I go there, I feel like a princess, that has just stepped out of my castle. I venture around, and view the beautiful surroundings. The wonderful countryside, and old streets. This is one place, time hasn’t affected, it is raw untouched, almost like it was when the first was first discovered. It will almost have you wondering what century you’re in.

If you love to explore new places, full of mystery and excitement, then Sandgate Australia is definitely the place to go. A place where you and your loved ones can spend the vacation of a lifetime, and take a little piece of it back home with you. There are many different activities to take part in, and keep sakes to bring home. Plus, the historical accommodations, are unlike any other. I would encourage anyone whom is looking for a dream vacation to check into Sandgate Australia, it will not leave you disappointed.

Our Blog

Categories

Newsletter Sign Up